Essential RC 4K video

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dominicm
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Essential RC 4K video

Post by dominicm » Sat Aug 10, 2019 7:54 am

Hope it's OK to create a thread here to share my filming of all things radio controlled in the aviation world...

The CARF Models B-2 flies at Weston Park International Model Show for the first time. On take off the B-2 inadvertently heads to the right and just gets into the air by virtue of a fortuitous bump in the grass strip. Quick reactions from the pilot on the ailerons steered the jet away and into its ascent to start its display. After several minutes of scale flight the final descent and landing almost turned into disaster with the B-2 touching down a little too early and bouncing off the undulating grass surface. Fortunately the acrobatic flip resulted in minimal damage.

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Larry I
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Post by Larry I » Sat Aug 10, 2019 1:26 pm

Why was he allowed to take off with someone in his flight path? Looks like someone was on the far end of the runway retrieving a Hawk. Also why did he take off L to R but land R to L. Changing winds or very calm?
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dominicm
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Post by dominicm » Sun Aug 11, 2019 5:44 pm

The model accidentally veered to the right on take off. Maybe absence of rudder would account for that. Can't answer why change in direction on landing other than assume wind change made it best option.
Last edited by dominicm on Sun Aug 11, 2019 5:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Adam
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Post by Adam » Mon Aug 12, 2019 4:24 pm

I was at Weston Park too, with the full-sized teams. The full-size planes had to take off from the left and land from the right regardless of wind because the runway slopes up towards the left, and there are tall trees immediately after that. When the wind was too strong to take off/land in both directions, we simply didn't operate from the park - hence the Swift was the only aircraft to do so this year and everything else arrived and departed off-slot from other airfields. I know most of the models seemed to take off/land in which ever direction they pleased, but perhaps with the really big (and potentially less manoeuvrable?) ones like this B-2, they were similarly constrained as the full-size aircraft?

As for people being under the flight path, the rules in the UK for model shows seem very relaxed in comparison to the overbearing regulations for full-size displays. The glider crew and I were on the runway for some time with model acts going on directly above us (I was the guy running the glider wing on take-off) and the pyrotechnics crew had set up camp just beyond the runway and stayed there almost all day. Just like with real aircraft, there is a minimum seperation distance between the models and the crowd, but it seems crew members are exempt from this. For the full-sized acts at CAA-regulated shows, only "essential" crew were allowed beyond the designated crowd area, but when the models were flying, anyone there in an official role had a pretty free range as long as they weren't totally stupid.
Last edited by Adam on Mon Aug 12, 2019 4:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Larry I
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Post by Larry I » Tue Aug 13, 2019 1:17 am

I photograph a lot of the RC events in MAAC Zone G (Ottawa Valley & area) plus a couple of jet events in another zone which are run at full scale airports. Our rules don't allow mixing full scale & RC thanks to an expensive accident many years ago. Depending on the event we usually allow 3 to 5 aircraft to be in the air at the same time and the pilots & spotters are allowed at the flight line (so am I) & there may be a few other highly skilled pilots there in case a pilot needs someone to take over due to rough wind conditions etc that has them uncomfortable trying to land. The other registered pilots stay away until it's their turn to fly. Spectators must stay even further back in designated areas. We wouldn't allow a take off, especially a jet take off with someone retrieving a plane along the runway or at either side unless well off to the side from the take off zone. When anyone wants to go out onto the runway or cross it for whatever reason (usually needed after a crash or dead stick that didn't make the runway area) they must call it out & be sure the pilots & spotters acknowledge they have heard the information. During that time low passes along the runway are not allowed & all of the pilots will avoid the area unless there is a dead stick situation & if that happens that's called out several times so everyone knows to watch where it's heading in an attempt to land.
Wind direction usually dictates take off / landing direction as well as which way the pilots fly the race track style oval circuit they fly but if the wind changes the pilots in the air can agree to reverse that pattern as a group. When it's reversed the next pilots to fly go with the new direction until the winds change again (if they do). Also our rules do not allow maiden flights or test flights after repairs or alterations due to the potential risk to spectators. That stuff must be done on the practice days or at your local field in advance of the event or after the event has ended.
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Adam
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Post by Adam » Tue Aug 13, 2019 10:08 am

I think, unfortunately, the UK regulations aren't sufficiently developed for model airshows, particularly with regard to keeping good seperation between the models and people who are not members of the crowd. Another area that seems overly relaxed is energy-on-crowd rules. The model pilots tend not to fly circuits, but full, aerobatic display profiles like a full-size demonstration team. Now, I think that's great, except in the full-size world, the seperation distance from the crowd is greater when you have energy directed towards the crowd. That rule doesn't exist for models, which means they sometimes come belting towards the crowd and only turn away at the last moment, at the normal 75m seperation line, which seems like madness! When things got a little sketchy, the event commentator would gently remind pilots to fly responsibly over the PA system. Sadly I fear there could one day be a very serious accident at a UK model show because of this energy-on-crowd component.

As for the mixing of model and full-size, the rules on this have changed recently but the general principle is that this isn't allowed. Many model shows here do have full-size aircraft taking part, but while the full-size planes are in the vicinity, all models must be on the ground and everyone other "essential" crew moves back to the main spectator area, just like at a normal airshow. We're generally much stricter on this in the UK than in the US, and there have been shows where a single parked car or boat near the display area has been enough to scupper an entire full-size flying display.

However, we do allow combined model/full-size displays. A few years ago, an Extra 300 pilot started doing a synchronised display with a model Extra 300 (see video below - not my video).

Last year, the authorities stepped in and said this needed special dispensation; you are now allowed to include a model/SUA in your full-size display provided you have demonstrated the ability to do so safely to a Display Authorisation Examiner, and the exemption is then added to your Display Authorisation. My team was the first to go through this process in February this year and we now regularly fly an SUA within our display. In our case, we made it safe by using glass walls/floors to make sure the drone and full-size planes never share the same airspace, and the drone must be flown by a qualified operator, plus some other caveats. You can see the spectacular results below. The drone footage is anything taken from the air with two aircraft in shot, while the rest was taken with GoPros or a conventional video camera, and I can take credit for the latter!


Apologies for the thread drift but it's a very interesting topic.
Last edited by Adam on Tue Aug 13, 2019 10:10 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Larry I
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Post by Larry I » Tue Aug 13, 2019 11:28 pm

I watched the dual act video just before leaving to see the Red Arrows (1st card is downloading now). They looked very impressive & must have practiced that routine. It was a great performance but I doubt anything like that will be allowed here in Canada.
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dominicm
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Post by dominicm » Sun Aug 25, 2019 3:37 pm

Steve Holland flies his exceptional scratch built scale replica of the DH.88 Comet G-ACSS 'Grosvenor House' that won the famous 1934 England-Australia MacRobertson Air Race from the United Kingdom to Australia. This model is powered by 2 Zenoah 74s and in total it cost Steve £5000 in materials to build it.

The de Havilland DH.88 Comet is a British two-seat, twin-engined aircraft built by the de Havilland Aircraft Company. It was developed specifically to participate in the 1934 England-Australia MacRobertson Air Race from the United Kingdom to Australia. Development of the DH.88 Comet was initiated at the behest of British aviation pioneer Geoffrey de Havilland, along with the support of de Havilland's board, being keen to garner prestige from producing the victorious aircraft as well as to gain from the research involved in producing it. The Comet was designed by A. E. Hagg around the specific requirements of the race; Hagg produced an innovative design in the form of a stressed-skin cantilever monoplane, complete with an enclosed cockpit, retractable undercarriage, landing flaps, and variable-pitch propellers.

Three Comets were produced for the race, all for private owners at the discounted price of £5,000 per aircraft. The aircraft underwent a rapid development cycle, performing its maiden flight only six weeks prior to the race. Comet G-ACSS Grosvenor House emerged as the winner. Two further examples were later built. The Comet went on to establish a multitude of aviation records, both during the race and in its aftermath, as well as participating in further races. Several examples were bought and evaluated by national governments, typically as mail planes. Two Comets, G-ACSS and G-ACSP, survived into preservation, while a number of full-scale replicas have also been constructed.

Last edited by dominicm on Sun Aug 25, 2019 3:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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dominicm
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Post by dominicm » Sat Aug 31, 2019 11:50 am

Keeping the memory of Concorde alive. This giant scale dual turbine powered, Concorde is about as realistic as it can get.

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RyanS
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Post by RyanS » Wed Sep 04, 2019 1:36 pm

I'm not seeing the difference between this thread and the other thread. Am I missing something?
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